-scope

-scope
comb. form forming nouns denoting:
1 a device looked at or through (kaleidoscope; telescope).
2 an instrument for observing or showing (gyroscope; oscilloscope).
Derivatives:
-scopic comb. form forming adjectives.
Etymology: from or after mod.L -scopium f. Gk skopeo look at

* * *

\\ˌskōp\ noun combining form (-s)
Etymology: New Latin -scopium, from Greek -skopion, from skopein
: a means (as an instrument) for viewing with the eye or observing in any way

microscope

* * *

a combining form meaning "instrument for viewing," used in the formation of compound words: telescope. Cf. -scopy.
[ < NL -scopium < Gk -skopion, -skopeion, equiv. to skop(eîn) to look at (akin to sképtesthai to look, view carefully; cf. SKEPTIC) + -ion, -eion n. suffix]

* * *

-scope /-skōp/
combining form
An instrument for viewing, examining, or detecting, as in telescope, oscilloscope, stethoscope
ORIGIN: Gr skopeein to view

* * *

scope 1 «skohp», noun.
1. a) the distance the mind can reach; extent of view: »

Very hard words are not within the scope of a child's understanding.

SYNONYM(S): compass. See syn. under range. (Cf.range) b) the area over which any activity operates or is effective; range of application: »

This subject is not within the scope of our investigation. Beyond the scope of all speculation (Edmund Burke).

SYNONYM(S): compass. See syn. under range. (Cf.range)
2. room to range; space; opportunity: »

Football gives scope for courage and quick thinking. I gave full scope to my imagination (Laurence Sterne).

3. the range or length of flight of an arrow or other missile.
4. a) extent; length; sweep: »

The yacht's gig was towing easily at the end of a long scope of line (Joseph Conrad).

b) the length of cable at which a ship rides when at anchor.
5. Archaic. an aim; purpose; ultimate object.
[< Italian scopo, learned borrowing from Late Latin scopus < Greek skopós aim, object < skopeîn behold, consider]
scope2 «skohp», noun. Informal.
1. an instrument for viewing, such as a microscope, telescope, or radarscope.
2. a telescopic sight for a rifle: »

All were equipped with 20-power scopes (New York Times).

[back formation < telescope, radarscope]
combining form. an instrument for viewing, examining, or observing: »

Telescope = an instrument for viewing distant objects. Stethoscope = an instrument for examining the chest.

[< New Latin -scopium < Greek -skopion < skopeîn look at, examine]

* * *

comb. form denoting an instrument for observing, viewing, or examining

microscope | telescope

Origin:
from modern Latin -scopium, from Greek skopein ‘look at’

* * *

-scope
an ending representing mod.L. -scopium (f. Gr. σκοπεῖν to look at, examine) in microscope and telescope. Hence used, by addition to Greek stems, to form many words denoting scientific instruments or contrivances for enabling the eye to view or examine or make observations: as autoscope, baroscope, chronoscope, dynamoscope, gyroscope, helioscope, laryngoscope, ophthalmoscope, periodoscope, etc. (Cf. F. -scope, It. -scopio, etc.) Also added to L. stems, as in fluoroscope, oscilloscope, and to Eng. words, as in radarscope, sniperscope.

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

Игры ⚽ Поможем сделать НИР

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scope — scope·less; seis·mo·scope; sig·moid·o·scope; ski·a·scope; snip·er·scope; snoop·er·scope; spec·tro·he·li·o·scope; spec·tro·scope; spin·thar·i·scope; stat·i·scope; stato·scope; stau·ro·scope; stereo·scope; stro·bo·scope; syn·chron·o·scope;… …   English syllables

  • Scope — or Scopes may refer to: * Scope (programming), the range in which a variable can be referenced * Scope (mouthwash), a mouthwash brand by Procter Gamble * SCOPE (TV series) * Scope (charity), a British charity that supports people with cerebral… …   Wikipedia

  • Scope — Scope, n. [It. scopo, L. scopos a mark, aim, Gr. skopo s, a watcher, mark, aim; akin to ?, ? to view, and perh. to E. spy. Cf. {Skeptic}, {Bishop}.] 1. That at which one aims; the thing or end to which the mind directs its view; that which is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • -scope — scope, scopie ♦ Éléments, du gr. skopos, skopia, de skopein « examiner, observer ». scope, scopie, scopique. éléments, du gr. skopos et skopia, de skopein, regarder, observer . ⇒ SCOPE, SCOPIE, élém. formants I. Scope. Élém. tiré du gr. ou tiré… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • scope — UK US /skəʊp/ noun [U] ► the range of things that an activity, company, law, etc. deals with: »large/ambitious in scope beyond/outside the scope of sth »He involved himself in affairs beyond the scope of his job. within the scope of sth »To come… …   Financial and business terms

  • Scope — steht für: den Sichtbarkeitsbereich einer Variable in der Programmierung, siehe Variable (Programmierung) Bereich, Ziel, Umfang im Projektmanagement, siehe Scope Management eine DSP basierte Musikplattform von Creamware, siehe Scope… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • scope — I noun ambit, amplitude, area, boundary, bounds, circle, circuit, compass, confines, demesne, expanse, extent, field, latitude, limit, locus, margin, orbit, purview, range, reach, realm, region, room, space, span, sphere, spread, stretch, sweep,… …   Law dictionary

  • Scope — est un super vilain créé par Marvel Comics. Il est apparu pour la première fois dans Marvel Comics Presents #49, en 1990. Origine Scope était un voyou travaillant pour des dealers. Il réussit à détecter Daredevil mais fut sévèrement battu par ce… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • -scope — [Gr. skopo s a watcher, spy. See {Scope}.] A combining form usually signifying an instrument for viewing (with the eye) or observing (in any way); as in microscope, telescope, altoscope, anemoscope. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scope — [ skɔp ] n. m. • 1968; de cinémascope ♦ Procédé de cinéma employant l anamorphose horizontale de l image au rapport 2. scope [skɔp] n. m. ÉTYM. 1968; de cinémascope. ❖ ♦ Anglic. Abréviation de cinémascope. || Un film en scope …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • -scope — word forming element indicating an instrument for seeing, from L.L. scopium, from Gk. skopion, from skopein to look at, examine (see SCOPE (Cf. scope) (n.1)) …   Etymology dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”